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Field Trip – Roswell

Posted by on Apr 27, 2018

Roswell, New Mexico As a member of Amarillo’s Association of Desk and Derrick Club for over 25 years, I make an effort to attend the Regional meetings, not just to see the many friends I’ve made through the years, but also because of the field trips to job sites. I have learned so much about the varied workforce associated with the American Energy industry. From touring Board rooms and high rise offices to learning about family owned service companies,...

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Power of the Purse

Posted by on Apr 11, 2018

This week a hometown friend invited me to the Tenth Anniversary celebration and fundraiser for Power of the Purse, which features a purse auction to benefit the Laura W. Bush Institute for Women’s Health. Over 1,000 women attended to hear former first lady, Mrs. Laura Bush, talk about the efforts they have made in raising awareness about women’s health issues. Ten years ago, representatives from Texas Tech University Health Science Center in Amarillo, Texas traveled to Washington D.C. with a...

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Checking Cows

Posted by on Mar 23, 2018

Checking Cows After moving eight miles from town and down the road from my in-laws, I wondered at my father-in-law’s compulsion to drive through his cattle every single day, sometimes twice. My husband did the same. We drove through the steers he fed out on leased grass most every day until the fall when they were taken to the sale barn. Watching the herd graze under an endless blue sky from our new front porch was enjoyable, but nothing...

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Cowboy Gear: BOOTS

Posted by on Mar 9, 2018

Cowboy boots, high-heeled boots, custom-mades, short tops were pee-wees. The early version of boots seen in the West did not always have high-heels, which has become synonymous with the American cowboy style. Early over-the-counter boots were plain with a lower heel and cost around $15.00. Cowboys began to wear higher heels which provided leverage, pointed toes could slip in and out of stirrups easier, 17-inch high tops protected legs and had pull-straps called “mule-ears”. It wasn’t until 1885 that...

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